Baseball

 

Gators Baseball Team

Announcements

Our 2017 Gators’ next opponents are Lancaster Baptist and Mojave.

 

What are the Rules for High School Baseball?
Please review the following rules:
NFHS Baseball Rules
Please review the following videos:

BATTING:
Batting Fundamentals by Tony Gwynn
Load and Unload by Josh Donaldson
Jumping at Ball Fix

THROWING:
Throw Like a Pro  —-NEW

Water Bottle Drill — Perform this drill daily
Throwing Drill
Direction and Weight Shift 1
Direction and Weight Shift 2

FIELDING:
Relays – Very Important!!
Fielding Grounders with Brandon Phillips
Underhanding to second base
Flip Drill
Wall Ball Drill
Outfield Tips
Outfield Drop Step – All Outfielders should practice the drop step.  This will give you a head start on any fly ball hit towards you.
3B Tips
3B Mechanics
Derek Jeter’s Shortstop Mechanics
1B Tips from Don Mattingly

 

PITCHING AND CATCHING:
Mouthguards can improve velocity
Pick Off moves to 1B
Arm Strengthening Drill – Perform daily
Printable Guide for Catchers
Balk Rules
Pitching Position RulesPRIMETIME PITCHING MECHANICS:
The purpose of proper pitching mechanics is to throw the ball accurately into the strike zone with maximum velocity.  Improper mechanics will cause a drop in velocity of 5-7mph and poor control of the strike zone.  You must master the strike zone before being able to command pitches (placing pitches exactly where you want inside and outside of the strike zone).
Image 1: Lift and Explode. Lift the front leg straight up with the foot pointing upward or straight.  Your load is now on the upper body where the ball is held.  Now you will transfer the load down to your back leg by dipping the back knee slightly while using the back calf and foot to forcefully push the lower body forward and down towards home plate.  Do not allow the front leg to swing out in a circle.  From the top of the leg lift to front foot strike, you will take .8 seconds or less to accomplish this.  This requires an explosive push towards your landing. Your throwing arm relaxingly moves quickly into a high cocked position.  Do not flex or muscle up your throwing arm at this point.  It is semi-relaxed.

Image 2: Power Position.  The front foot strike at landing should be strong and stiff, fully braced.  Do not allow the front knee to collapse.  Your back leg is 90% straight and extended due to the explosive push in image 1.  Your glove arm is pointing towards home plate, whether it’s the elbow or the glove itself. Your upper body is slightly leaning back towards second base.  Your belt buckle is pointing towards third base.  Your throwing arm now starts to flex, with the ball facing the short stop position.\

Image 3: Slingshot.  Your upper body starts to lean forward.  Do not keep the upper body upright.  The front hips and abdominals turn to face home plate while the back shoulder explodes forward, pulling the arm around to put the throwing arm into a sling shot position.  The back foot drags off of the rubber without coming off of the ground or only slightly at the most.  You’re not jumping off of the rubber.

Image 4: Release. The upper body leans forward at a 45 degree angle.  The throwing arm’s forearm (not upper arm, not hand) accelerates to launch the ball on a downward plane.  The hand releases the ball with the fingers over the top of the ball with both tips of the index and middle fingers as aligned as possible with each other and the space the between the fingers aligned with the thumb below, providing equal pressure on the ball.  Release the ball by pinching the fingers and thumb together to create maximum spin.

Image 5: Glove Tuck and Pronate. After release, the upper body falls forward and collapses to near parallel to the ground.  The glove tucks under the armpit to keep it a close distance to your body in order to quickly field any balls hit back up to you.  After release, your throwing arm pronates counter-clockwise as if your hand is opening a door knob.  This protects your elbow from the stress of throwing.  Pronate after release, not before.

Image 6: Follow through and Kick back.  The throwing arm continues its initial acceleration until the hand nearly touches the ground.  The back leg automatically kicks up from the forces pulling on it from the hip and shoulder rotation and upper body falling forward towards home plate.  If your back leg isn’t kicking up by itself after release and follow through of the arm, you’re not rotating your body and your arm hard enough when releasing the ball.

2017 Gators Baseball Team

Isaac Martinez SS
Herik Ayala LF
Isaac Flores 2B
David Gonzalez 3B
Jonathan Rocha P/C
Josue Castillo LF
Aidan Sierra CF
Gonzalo Resendiz 1B
Jose Hernandez LF
Alexis Salamanca RF
Victor Morales 1B
Sal Garcia C
Fausto Chavira RF
Andy Acosta 2B


Guidance Charter High School Boys Baseball Team Info

 

 


Robert Sosa
Head Coach
rsosa@thegcs.org


Tri Ly
Assistant Coach
tly@thegcs.org

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